Invitation “Examining the Progress of the World Bank's Commitment to Universal Social Protection”

The Global Campaign for the Right to Social Security invites you to join our session at the Civil Society Policy Forum (CSPF), titled “Examining the Progress of the World Bank's Commitment to Universal Social Protection.” You can also attend online.

The event will take place on April 17, 2024 at the World Bank I Building 2-250 from 16:15 pm to 17:45 pm (GMT-4).

English - Français - Español

     

The Working Group on Financing Social Protection of the Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors (GCSPF) and the INSP!R network, we are inviting you to participate in this webinar to discuss the UN Global Accelerator on Jobs and Social Protection for Just Transitions.

The UN Global Accelerator on Jobs and Social Protection for Just Transitions, launched in September 2021 by the UN Secretary-General, signals the UN system’s collective response for addressing the multiple challenges that threaten to erase development progress.

Members of the GCSPF are participating in the Steering Group, and today we invite you to join us to share information about this initiative and to discuss the crucial role of civil society organizations and trade unions in ensuring representation, both domestically and internationally.

The Global Accelerator will support countries committed to create decent jobs, expanding social protection and promote pathways for just transitions. You can check here if your country is among the pathfinder countries, which means that your country is part of this initiative and, in this case, its level of engagement.

This webinar will take place on Friday, April 26th at 1 pm UTC. You can confirm your local time here.

Interpretation services will be available in English, Spanish and French.

Registration link: https://ituc-csi-org.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYpcumgrTMiHtRbGLEca3L8ckG5N1YEZPoS

We would greatly appreciate it if you could share this invitation within your network and colleagues.

For any further information, please feel free to contact us.

     

Français

     

Invitation
Rejoignez le webinaire sur l’accélérateur mondial des Nations Unies

     

Le Groupe de travail sur le financement de la protection sociale de la Coalition mondiale pour les socles de protection sociale (GCSPF) et le réseau INSP!R, nous vous invitons à participer à ce webinaire pour discuter de l' Accélérateur mondial des Nations Unies pour l'emploi et la protection sociale pour des transitions justes .

L' Accélérateur mondial des Nations Unies pour l'emploi et la protection sociale pour des transitions justes , lancé en septembre 2021 par le Secrétaire général de l'ONU, témoigne de la réponse collective du système des Nations Unies pour relever les multiples défis qui menacent d'effacer les progrès en matière de développement.

Les membres du GCSPF participent au groupe de pilotage et nous vous invitons à nous rejoindre pour partager des informations sur cette initiative et discuter du rôle crucial des organisations de la société civile et des syndicats pour assurer la représentation, tant au niveau national qu'international.

L’Accélérateur mondial soutiendra également les pays déterminés à créer des emplois décents, à étendre la protection sociale et à promouvoir des transitions justes. Vous pouvez vérifier ici si votre pays ( pays éclaireurs ) fait partie de cette initiative et son niveau d'engagement.

Ce webinaire aura lieu le vendredi 26 avril à 13h00 UTC. Vous pouvez confirmer votre heure locale ici .

Des services d'interprétation seront disponibles en anglais, espagnol et français.

Lien d'inscription : https://ituc-csi-org.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYpcumgrTMiHtRbGLEca3L8ckG5N1YEZPoS

Pour toute information complémentaire, n'hésitez pas à nous contacter.

 

 

Español

     

Invitación
Participa en el seminario web sobre el Acelerador Mundial de las Naciones Unidas

     

El Grupo de Trabajo sobre Financiación de la Protección Social de la Coalición Global por los Pisos de Protección Social (GCSPF, por su sigla en inglés) y la red INSP!R, les invitamos a participar en un seminario web para compartir información sobre el Acelerador mundial del empleo y la protección social para transiciones justas de Naciones Unidas.

En septiembre de 2021 el Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas presentó el Acelerador mundial del empleo y la protección social para transiciones justas, cuyo objetivo es acelerar las acciones mundiales necesarias para promover la recuperación de empleo, así como transiciones ecológicas, tecnológicas y sociales justas hacia economías más sostenibles e inclusivas.

Miembros de la GCSPF participan en el Grupo Directivo, y en esta oportunidad les invitamos a participar en este seminario web para compartir información sobre esta iniciativa y discutir el rol crucial de las organizaciones de la sociedad civil y de los sindicatos para garantizar la representación, tanto a nivel nacional como internacional.

El Acelerador Global apoyará a los países comprometidos con la creación de empleos decentes, la ampliación de la protección social y la promoción de vías para transiciones justas. Puedes ver aquí si tu país se encuentra entre los países pioneros que forman parte de esta iniciativa y, en ese caso, también su nivel de compromiso.

Este seminario web tendrá lugar el viernes 26 de abril, 1 pm UTC. Puedes confirmar aquí tu hora local.

Habrá interpretación en inglés, español y francés.

Zoom (requiere inscripción previa): https://ituc-csi-org.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYpcumgrTMiHtRbGLEca3L8ckG5N1YEZPoS

Les agradecemos que compartan esta invitación con sus redes y colegas.

No dudes en ponerte en contacto con nosotros si quieres información adicional.

Ms. Sylvia Beales Gelber and Ms. Odile Frank, both members of the Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors (GCSPF), participated at the 2024 UNECE Regional Forum on Sustainable Development.

Ms Sylvia Beales Gelber and Ms Odile Frank spoke in Round Table 1: SDG1 - No Poverty (Preparing social protection systems to respond to the poverty impacts of the climate crisis and green transitions) that was held on 13 March 2024. This session was part of the Opening and High-level Policy Segment. Further information on this session is available here and the recording is here.

Odile Frank highlighted there are two major ways in which social protection has an impact on what we are going to experience from climate change. The first is clearly the issue of shocks and crises and the immediate solutions required for populations that have been made vulnerable by these crises and this is a very important function of social protection. The other area is the usefulness of social protection to assist workers in undergoing just transition to green, and I insist that just transition to green is not only a green transition, but it should also be accountable in respect of ILO recommendations regarding decent work and respect for labour rights.

Sylvia Beales Gelber highlighted the history and the rationale of the SPF recommendation 202, and that the right to social security for all is enshrined in the 1948 UDHR and a range of subsequent human rights provisions and treaties. However over half of the world still does not have access to the full range of social protection guarantees;  including in the UNECE region. Updated and fully disaggregated data is essential to ensure all people across their life course have social protection, as is adequate and long term finance.  As the world ages in all regions social protection is a vital and essential policy measure to lessen intergenerational transfer of poverty. 

Sylvia explained the life course elements of the social protection floor, as it provides for basic income in childhood, old age, for persons with disability and the unemployed together with access to health.  Design for social protection must be multidimensional and integrated as communities are composed of people of different ages, sex, ethnicities and locations; all with different charteristics. Civil society organisation are well equipped to identify gaps in social protection as they know what is going on at local level. Barriers to access to entitlements can often be due to lack of legal documentation, itself a denial to rights.  Members of the GCSPF are working on issues of legal documentation for children and adults. Social protection accountability to maximise the reach of social protection is another important area of work for members of the Coalition. Population movement due to conflict and climate change means that there are gaps and errors in documention held by local officials and in national data systems. This can be corrected with civil society monitoring leading to more inclusive mechanisms being put in place. 

Multiple studies and country experiences show it is perfectly possible both to have accurate data for social protection and to set a national budget within each country. Financing social protection and system building for it over the long term is a matter of global and national  political will. The Global Coalition, comprising over 120 civil society organisations, thinktanks and NGOs  is calling for a solidarity based Global Fund for Social Protection to ensure the necessary finance and technical know how is available for all countries in all regions to put in place the right of all to universal provision.  

Sylvia also talked about how social protection has positive outcomes for people of all ages and countries is not in doubt. Social protection is both a human rights and a fundamental lever for the achievement of all SDGS and its financing is of utmost priority in the final six years of SDG implementation. There is no time to waste.  

This round table allowed participants to learn from each other and share information on the best ways to address the growing poverty impacts of the climate crisis in the region as well as explore potential gains from green and digital transitions.

The UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) convened its annual regional forum on sustainable development (RFSD) in preparation for the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) in July 2024. The forum explored opportunities for advancing key transitions and cooperation towards achieving the SDGs in the region and discussed progress towards the Goals undergoing in-depth review in 2024.

The 2024 UNECE Regional Forum on Sustainable Development took place in Geneva, Switzerland, from 13 to 14 March. The UNECE region comprises the countries of Europe as well as countries in North America (Canada and the US), Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan), and Western Asia (Israel).

The video of the side event “The transformative potential of expanding the coverage of child benefits to eliminate child poverty” is now online. The side event was held on February 14, 2024 during the 62nd Session of the Commission for Social Development (CSocD62).

Child poverty is one of the world’s greatest challenges to the realisation of the SDGs and children’s rights, including the right to survival, learning and protection. In 2022, 330 million children lived in extreme poverty, with children comprising more than half of the world’s 1.1 billion people experiencing multidimensional poverty. 

Through the SDGs, world leaders committed to eradicate poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, including by putting in place social protection floors (SPFs) by 2030 and guaranteeing access to quality essential health care for all and basic income security for children, persons with disabilities, older persons and the unemployed.

While governments have made some progress in building inclusive social protection systems, children are frequently left the furthest behind. For instance, in 2021, more than 73 percent of girls and boys worldwide did not receive any child or family cash benefits at all, leaving them particularly vulnerable and at risk to the irreversible and long-lasting impacts of poverty, stunting and wasting, inadequate access to health and education services on human capability development.

To promote awareness and use of Universal Child Benefits (UCBs) as an effective means to reduce child poverty and support child development, the International Labour Organization (ILO), Save the Children and UNICEF launched a new tool, the Global Child Benefits Tracker during the CSocD62 in New York. As indicated by the recent report of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights in his report to the Human Rights Council, UCBs are one of the most inclusive, effective and fairest approaches to reach those furthest behind. 

The aim of this tool is to provide a dedicated knowledge management platform to foster progressive and evidence-based dialogue, drawing on best practice, on the need for and feasibility of greater investment in child-sensitive social protection.

Speakers and Panelists

Opening Remarks: Cynthia Samuel-Olonjuwon, Special Representative to the United Nations and Director of the ILO Office in New York

Keynote Speaker: Philip Alston, former UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights

Moderated Discussion

  • Jane Kitili, Director Social Protection, Ministry of Labour and Social Protection, Republic of Kenya
  • H.E. Ambassador Olivier Maes, Permanent Representative of Luxembourg
  • H.E. Ambassador Enkhbold Vorshilov, Permanent Representative of Mongolia

    Moderated by Cynthia Samuel-Olonjuwon, Special Representative to the United Nations and Director of the ILO Office in New York

    Presentation of the Global Child Benefits Tracker
  • David Lambert Tumwesigye, Global Policy & Advocacy Lead, Child Poverty, Save the Children International

    Closing Remarks
  • Natalia Winder Rossi, Global Director of Social Policy and Social Protection, UNICEF

This event was organised by Save the Children International, UNICEF and ILO and co-sponsored by the Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors (GCSPF), the Permanent Mission of Luxembourg and USP2030.     

The CSocD62 took place from 5 to 14 February 2024 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. The priority theme of the CSocD62 focused on "Fostering social development and social justice through social policies to accelerate progress on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and to achieve the overarching goal of poverty eradication"The emerging issue focused on "The Influence of Digital Transformation on Inclusive Growth and Development: A Path to Realizing Social Justice".

Download the concept note here. Further information is available here and at the UN's website.

The official virtual Side Event “Advocating Universal Social Protection (USP) Floors for Asian Countries” will be held on February 21, 2024 (Wednesday), from 16.30 – 17.45 Bangkok time (GMT+7).

The 11th Asia Pacific Forum for Sustainable Development (APFSD) will be organized from 20-23 February under the theme: “Reinforcing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and eradicating poverty in times of multiple crises: The effective delivery of sustainable, resilient and innovative solutions in Asia and the Pacific” at the United Nations Conference Center (UNCC) in Bangkok, Thailand.

Globally, the number of the extreme poor stands at 860 million. Over 820 million people goes hungry every day.

SDG 1.3 and other SDGs and targets mention social protection, but the SDG framework itself is being derailed as a consequence lack of commitment on the part of governments.

In Asia and pacific 930 million workers out of a total of the 1.3 billion informal economy workers (68%) are in vulnerable sectors. Female workers experience gender-based discrimination, receiving less pay than men and spending more time on unpaid care work.

The impact of climate change becomes more and more visible. More and more people are affected by natural disasters from Pakistan over Bangladesh to the Philippines. The people have also had to contend with inflation on food and energy. International debt among some low- and middle-income countries are limiting their investment in social protection. At the country level there are some social protection mechanisms covering the people of various ages, but even where there is good coverage, there are implementation gaps.

The side event will discuss the scope of Universal Social Protection Floors to address poverty, hunger, inequality and adapt to climate change.

This session is organized by the Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP) and co-organized by Wada Na Todo Abhiyan (India); NGO Federation of Nepal (Nepal); Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement - PRRM (Philippines); Noakhali Rural Development Society (Bangladesh); Sri Lanka United Nations Friendship Organisation (Sri Lanka); Pakistan Development Alliance (Pakistan); Coordination Committee of Cambodia (Cambodia); Sanayee Development Organisation (Afghanistan); ONE Singapore (Singapore); Africa Japan Forum (Japan); Asia Dalit Rights Forum; Global Forum on DWD and the Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors (GCSPF).

Link to register in the Virtual Side Event: https://us06web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYvcO-gqjIrGNZXd7-g4s6DIQWJmLAdbc6g

Download the concept note here.

The side event “The transformative potential of expanding the coverage of child benefits to eliminate child poverty” will be held on February 14, 2024 at 1:15 pm to 2:30 pm EST at Conference Room 11, UNHQ, New York. The event will be held during the 62nd Session of the Commission for Social Development (CSocD62).

Child poverty is one of the world’s greatest challenges to the realisation of the SDGs and children’s rights, including the right to survival, learning and protection. In 2022, 330 million children lived in extreme poverty, with children comprising more than half of the world’s 1.1 billion people experiencing multidimensional poverty. 

Through the SDGs, world leaders committed to eradicate poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, including by putting in place social protection floors (SPFs) by 2030 and guaranteeing access to quality essential health care for all and basic income security for children, persons with disabilities, older persons and the unemployed.

While governments have made some progress in building inclusive social protection systems, children are frequently left the furthest behind. For instance, in 2021, more than 73 percent of girls and boys worldwide did not receive any child or family cash benefits at all, leaving them particularly vulnerable and at risk to the irreversible and long-lasting impacts of poverty, stunting and wasting, inadequate access to health and education services on human capability development.

To promote awareness and use of Universal Child Benefits (UCBs) as an effective means to reduce child poverty and support child development, the International Labour Organization (ILO), Save the Children and UNICEF will launch a new tool, the Global Child Benefits Tracker during the CSocD62 in New York. As indicated by the recent report of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights in his report to the Human Rights Council, UCBs are one of the most inclusive, effective and fairest approaches to reach those furthest behind. 

The aim of this tool is to provide a dedicated knowledge management platform to foster progressive and evidence-based dialogue, drawing on best practice, on the need for and feasibility of greater investment in child-sensitive social protection.

Speakers and Panelists

Opening Remarks:
Cynthia Samuel-Olonjuwon, Special Representative to the United Nations and Director of the ILO Office in New York

Keynote Speaker:

Philip Alston, former UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights

Moderated Discussion

  • Jane Kitili, Director Social Protection, Ministry of Labour and Social Protection, Republic of Kenya
  • H.E. Ambassador Olivier Maes, Permanent Representative of Luxembourg
  • H.E. Ambassador Enkhbold Vorshilov, Permanent Representative of Mongolia

    Moderated by Cynthia Samuel-Olonjuwon, Special Representative to the United Nations and Director of the ILO Office in New York

    Presentation of the Global Child Benefits Tracker
  • David Lambert Tumwesigye, Global Policy & Advocacy Lead, Child Poverty, Save the Children International

    Questions and Answers

    Closing Remarks
  • Natalia Winder Rossi, Global Director of Social Policy and Social Protection, UNICEF

This event is organised by Save the Children International, UNICEF and ILO and co-sponsored by the Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors (GCSPF), the Permanent Mission of Luxembourg and USP2030.     

Link to participate online:
https://unvc.webex.com/unvc/j.php?MTID=m2a0c225f02eac227c16428d745da85be
Webinar number: 2343 658 0587
Webinar password: CSocD62_14Feb#24

Download the concept note here. Further information is available here.

In December 2023 the Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors (GCSPF) submitted its inputs for the preparation of the Zero Draft of the Pact for the Future. The GCSPF’s document is published on the UN’s website. Download pdf document.

Members of the GCSPF have also contributed with written inputs, among them: Amnesty International, Congregation of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd, Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP), HelpAge International, Human Rights Watch, ITUC, Make Mothers Matter (MMM), Save the Children International, Social Watch.

Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors - GCSPF

Chapeau

The right to Social Protection for all underpins the vision of the 2030 Agenda, the achievement of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals and the ambition of the Summit of the Future. This right is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and in several international human rights conventions.[1] However, four billion people worldwide, over half the global population, still live without adequate social protection.[2] Those denied social protection lack important means of escaping extreme poverty, ensuring sufficient food security for themselves and their families and accessing essential health and other services. Without effective social protection, inequalities within societies and between countries are increased – in particular, women and girls, people with disabilities and older persons are severely disadvantaged.

Therefore, it is right that target 3 of SDG 1 calls for social protection and social protection floors and that they are recognized as essential for the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – above all for the "leave no one behind" principle on which the entire Agenda is based.

Social protection floors, which should guarantee basic income and health protection over the life course[3], must be designed for the long term, as they must cover childhood and youth, working life and old age. Social protection must also be in place for future generations as those born today will not be able to lead a dignified life without it. All of this requires a solid financial basis underpinned by political will and inclusive and fairly designed governance structures – not only in the countries themselves, but also at the global level. Thus, social protection is a topic that relates to several chapters of the Pact for the Future, mainly chapters I, IV and V.

We therefore urge, that the Pact for the Future will include a specific commitment in its chapeau to universal social protection and to demonstrable tangible progress on social protection floors by 2030.

Chapter I. Sustainable development and financing for development

Without adequate social protection, it will be difficult, if not impossible, to achieve the goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In particular, the fight against poverty, the reduction of inequalities within and between societies, adequate food supply and health care, regular school attendance for children and the elimination of gender discrimination are goals that are inextricably linked to target 1.3 of the 2030 Agenda. Human rights for all are the foundation of the 2030 Agenda and yet the right to social protection is being denied to over half the global population. Some countries have succeeded in generating adequate domestic resources to ensure rights-based and sustainably financed social protection systems for the entire population. Other countries, however, do not yet have sufficient financial resources nor the political will to fully guarantee their population this protection. It is therefore essential and urgent that the international community both calls for universal social protection in all countries and supports the system building, rollout and the financing of social protection floors worldwide. With the Global Accelerator on Jobs and Social Protection proposed by the UN Secretary-General[4], global solutions to these problems are currently being sought. But financial and technical support can, and must be, significantly expanded[5], otherwise it will not be possible in many parts of the world to successfully implement social protection floors – the basis for achieving some of the key objectives of the 2030 Agenda.

Chapter II. International peace and security

Social protection plays a fundamental role in the prevention of conflicts when and where poverty and inequality are associated with other root causes of conflict. As countries reconstruct and communities regroup after conflict and disruption social protection is essential to support access to health and education, work and small scale investment. The potential benefit of ensuring the right to social protection for all to reduce and counter marginalization, radicalization, and extremism that fuel conflict should be acknowledged in the Summit conclusions and the language of the Pact.

Chapter III. Science, technology and innovation and digital cooperation

System building to deliver social protection requires up-to-date technology and data accuracy. Advances in this field significantly enhance governmental accountability and can support citizen inclusion in development. They are an important contribution to ensuring that social protection measures can also be expanded to the most vulnerable groups of society. Cooperation between countries and UN agencies on digital innovation for social protection is an exciting development which is supporting the building of robust governmental institutions, essential for SDG achievement.

Chapter IV. Youth and future generations

All countries are ageing, with life expectancy on the rise in the over 70’s age group, especially in the countries of the global south. Social protection protects all people from the cradle to the grave and ensures that older people can support their dependent family members and that young people can develop their future prospects in a safe social and economically stable environment, essential to counter the noxious effects of poverty on child development. This is why target 1.3 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (“Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable”) must be achieved. This applies a fortiori to future generations. Sustainable social protection will enable improved life conditions and create pathways to equitable life chances; future generations will not be able to enjoy decent lives unless adequate social protection is sustainably guaranteed for them. It is also important that the educational and employment rights of the youth related to social protection are guaranteed.

Chapter V. Transforming global governance

Global governance structures must be designed in such a way that all states – regardless of their economic and financial strength – can influence multilateral decisions on an equal basis. If international funds are set up to deal with global problems (e.g., in the areas of climate protection, health and food security or social protection), contributors and recipients must have equal rights in the decision-making process.[6] It is also important that the affected civilian population is adequately represented in these processes.

Building age and gender inclusive social protection systems should engage national populations and be a participatory process, which demonstrates good governance and robust national institutions. Putting in place financial and technical cooperation for universal social protection will demonstrate global commitment to inclusive, participatory and knowledge sharing processes from the local level to those at national, regional, and global levels.

International tax reform is needed globally to address lost revenues that must be recaptured for domestic government expenditure and international funds. We urge member countries to advance towards a UN Convention on Taxes that allows to fight tax evasion and illicit financial flows and thus generate the domestic resources indispensable for social protection.

Notes:

[1] Article 9 International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; Art. 5e iv International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination; Art. 11, para 1e Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women; Art. 26 Convention on the Rights of the Child; Art. 27 International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families; Art. 28 Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

[2] ILO (2021), World Social Protection Report 2020–22: Social protection at the crossroads – in pursuit of a better future, https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/@ed_protect/@soc_sec/documents/publication/wcms_817572.pdf.

[3] Social Protection Floors Recommendation (ILO R 202, 2012).

[4] https://unglobalaccelerator.org/.

[5] In June 2021, the International Labour Conference (ILC) called on the International Labour Organization (ILO) to “initiate and engage in discussions on concrete proposals for a new international financing mechanism, such as a Global Social Protection Fund, which could complement and support domestic resource mobilization efforts in order to achieve universal social protection“, ILC.109/Resolution III. See in this context also UN Human Rights Council (2021), Global fund for social protection: international solidarity in the service of poverty eradication, Report of the Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, A/HRC/47/36, 22.4.2021, https://www.ohchr.org/en/documents/thematic-reports/ahrc4736-global-fund-social-protection-international-solidarity-service; and Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors (2022), Civil Society Call for a Global Fund for Social Protection to respond to the COVID-19 crisis and to build a better future, https://www.socialprotectionfloorscoalition.org/civil-society-call/.

[6] If the Global Public Investment (GPI) approach is used, according to which all states involved in a financing mechanism pay contributions into the fund based on a fair share calculation (https://globalpublicinvestment.org/), an equal distribution between the groups of net contributors and net recipients must be ensured during voting.

The video of the event "Building a New Eco-social Contract and Advancing Social Security in Times of Debt and Austerity" is now online. The event took place on Friday, October 13, 2023 during the Civil Society Policy Forum of the WBG-IMF Annual Meetings 2023 held in Marrakech, Morocco.

Recent research analyzing IMF programs show that, far from “mitigating” austerity measures, IMF policies and social spending floors fail to address negative social impacts. The panel explored how the World Bank and IMF could build a human rights-based economy with better developmental outcomes.

The event was moderated by Shahir Ishak (Senior Social Protection Specialist, Inclusive Social Security Policy Forum).

And the speakers were Sarah Saadoun (Senior Researcher, Human Rights Watch), Allana Kembabazi (Program Manager, Initiative for Social and Economic Rights), Isabel Ortiz (Director of the Global Social Justice, Initiative for Policy Dialogue) and Rodrigo Cerda (Division Chief, IMF), the World Bank Group (WBG) declined the invitation to participate in the event.

The event was organized by Act church of Sweden, ActionAid international, AWC, ANND, Amnesty International, CESR, End Austerity Campaign, FTC, Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors (GCSPF), Global Social Justice/Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD), HRW, ISSPF, ISER, ITUC, Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation, Oxfam International, BWP, WIEGO, ARI and MenaFem.

Further information on this event is available here. Further information about the Right to Social Security Campaing is available here.

Members of the Social Security for all Campaign participated at the Annual Meetings of the World Bank Group (WBG) - International Monetary Fund (IMF) Annual Meetings 2023 held in Marrakech, Morocco, from 9 to 15 October, 2023.

Members of the Social Security for all Campaign participated at the Reclaim our Future Conference, from 8 to 9 October 2023. The event End Austerity! Reclaim the Right to Education, Health and Social Security took place on October 8th.

This session presented the new austerity policies advised by the IMF and the World Bank, and implemented by most Ministries of Finance, from cuts to public services and social security/social protection, to privatization and labor flexibilization reforms, affecting more than 6 billion people. All the human suffering these reforms cause is unnecessary: there are alternatives that even the poorest countries can implement to achieve human rights including the right to education, health and social security.

The speakers were Isabel Ortiz (Director of the Global Social Justice Programme), Matti Kohonen (Director of the Financial Transparency Coalition), Nabil Abdo (Senior Policy Advisor, Oxfam International), Roos Saalbrink (Global Lead on Economic Justice and Public Services, ActionAid International) and Sarah Saadoun (Senior Researcher and Advocate, Poverty and Inequality, Human Rights Watch).

Members of the Social Security for all Campaign participated at the Civil Society Policy Forum (CSPF) of the WBG-IMF Annual Meetings 2023, from 9 to 13 October 2023. The event "Building a New Eco-social Contract and Advancing Social Security in Times of Debt and Austerity" took place on Friday, October 13th. The video is here and further information is available here.

Recent research analyzing IMF programs show that, far from “mitigating” austerity measures, IMF policies and social spending floors fail to address negative social impacts. The panel explored how the World Bank and IMF could build a human rights-based economy with better developmental outcomes.

The event was moderated by Shahir Ishak (Senior Social Protection Specialist, Inclusive Social Security Policy Forum). And the speakers were Sarah Saadoun (Senior Researcher, Human Rights Watch), Allana Kembabazi (Program Manager, Initiative for Social and Economic Rights), Isabel Ortiz (Director of the Global Social Justice, Initiative for Policy Dialogue) and Rodrigo Cerda (Division Chief, IMF), the World Bank Group (WBG) declined the invitation to participate in the event.

Members of the Social Security for all Campaign participated at the Global Counter-Summit of Social Movements, that was held from 12 to 15 October 2023. See the programme here.

Further information about the Right to Social Security Campaign is available here. Please sign on to the statement using this link here, and help us spread the word and encourage others for endorsements.

The session “Building a New Eco-social Contract and Advancing Social Security in Times of Debt and Austerity” will take place during the Civil Society Policy Forum (CSPF) of the WBG-IMF Annual Meetings 2023 in Marrakech, Morocco.

Recent research (for instance, by Oxfam, IPD, and HRW) analyzing IMF programs show that, far from “mitigating” austerity measures, IMF policies and social spending floors fail to address negative social impacts. The panel will explore how the World Bank and IMF could build a human rights-based economy with better developmental outcomes.

The organizers of the session are Act Church of Sweden, ActionAid international, AWC, Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND), Amnesty International, CESR, End Austerity Campaign, FTC, GCSPF, Global Social Justice/Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD), HRW, ISSPF, ISER, ITUC, Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation, Oxfam International, BWP, WIEGO, ARI and MenaFem.

Moderator: Shahir Ishak, Senior Social Protection Specialist, Inclusive Social Security Policy Forum

The Panelists are:

  • Sarah Saadoun, Senior Researcher, Human Rights Watch
  • Allana Kembabazi, Program Manager, Initiative for Social and Economic Rights
  • Isabel Ortiz, Director, Global Social Justice, Initiative for Policy Dialogue
  • Rodrigo Cerda, Division Chief, Expenditure Policy Division, Fiscal Affairs Department, International Monetary Fund (IMF)
  • Invitation declined, World Bank Group (WBG)

Friday, October 13th, 2023 - 2 pm - 3:30 pm (Marrakech time). Confirm your local time here.
Hybrid session: Location Room SC03 Saghro
Join us on Zoom at: https://imf.zoom.us/j/91582662390?pwd=dUtYUjIwNnI4NnJDbFFYTmt4ZGpUZz09

Civil Society Call for a Global Fund for Social Protection

Over 200 civil society organizations and trade unions unite to call for a Global Fund for Social Protection to protect the most vulnerable during COVID-19 and beyond.

Read the Call

SP&PFM Programme

The programme Improving Synergies Between Social Protection and Public Finance Management provides medium-term support to multiple countries aiming to strengthen their social protection systems at a national level and ensure sustainable financing. The programme aims to support countries in their efforts towards achieving universal social protection coverage.

This initiative is implemented jointly by the ILO, Unicef, and the GCSPF.

Read more

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